Showing posts tagged cool shit

luckywelivecalifornia:

sydneytakesphotos:

black sand is better

i can’t believe the notes!!!!

(Source: sydneynoellephoto)

(Reblogged from fertile-mind-seeks-water)
(Reblogged from fertile-mind-seeks-water)
(Reblogged from fertile-mind-seeks-water)
pixandwords:

upgraders:

unclefather:

this is what our tax dollars pay for

good

…
I’m okay with this.

 I wonder if our dogs and the soviet dogs get along. 

pixandwords:

upgraders:

unclefather:

this is what our tax dollars pay for

good

I’m okay with this.

 I wonder if our dogs and the soviet dogs get along. 

(Source: ruinlion)

(Reblogged from pixandwords)
(Reblogged from djferreira224)
(Reblogged from baremidrifffs)
(Reblogged from streat-dreems)

catsbeaversandducks:

And now, a Baby Otter.

Via BuzzFeed

(Reblogged from keepcalmandruckover)

big-catsss:

"This sequence was from an incredible morning in Bandhavgarh NP, India on 23rd March 2000. I believe the pair of Indian Wolves had a den close by as we had seen them on the previous few days at this particular spot. When the young male tiger, B1 "Raj", appeared the wolves zig-zagged across the track behind it. One of the wolves followed it for some distance along the track provoking the tiger to turn around and face the wolf. The tiger only really had to make the simple gesture of turning around to dissuade the wolf from getting any closer."

Tiger vs Wolf by Calidris!

(Reblogged from earthandanimals)
(Reblogged from bythepowercosmic)

shotatanewleaf:

Loch Shiel, Scotland, just past the village of Glenfinnan.

(Reblogged from shotatanewleaf)

kqedscience:

Waterspouts Over the Adriatic Sea

The photo above shows an eye-popping complex of waterspouts I observed over theAdriatic Sea on a boat trip to Brindisi, Italy. As we departed, the weather was very summer like — some humidity, hot and sunny. Cumuliform clouds developed during our excursion, but the weather didn’t appear threatening. In fact, the atmospheric pressure was stable at 1024 millibars.

Suddenly, we saw a line of funnel clouds straight in front of our boat! The photo shows the most recently formed waterspout in the foreground; the oldest spout, in the background, would disappear in a few seconds. Our boat actually passed through the scary funnels. The spouts were spaced about 1/3 nautical mile from each other. I asked the boat’s captain if he thought cruising past the spouts would be dangerous, but apparently, he wasn’t bothered much by their proximity.

Nevertheless, waterspouts can generate winds of over 70 mph (F0 on the enhanced Fujita Scale) and can be hazardous to boaters.”

Photo Credit: Roberto Giudici

(Reblogged from scinerds)